[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Elbow dysplasia (ED) affects the elbow joint in dogs primarily as a result of several genetic developmental abnormalities. These abnormalities affect the growth of cartilage at the joint or the surrounding structures. The lack of cartilage results in high levels of wear and tear on the elbow joint, eventually leading to other problems such as osteoarthritis.1,2,3

Elbow Dysplasia Image

X-ray of canine elbow dysplasia, with arrows indicating defects in the joint.

ED is commonly found in certain large-breed dogs, such as Chow Chows, Rottweilers, Boerboels, Bulldogs, Bernese Mountain dogs, Labradors, Newfoundlands, and smaller dogs, such as Pugs and Black Russian Terriers.4[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_separator][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Causes” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” google_fonts=”font_family:Droid%20Sans%3Aregular%2C700|font_style:700%20bold%20regular%3A700%3Anormal” css=”.vc_custom_1476382762280{padding-bottom: 2% !important;}”][vc_column_text]Elbow dysplasia most commonly occurs as a result of several genetic developmental abnormalities that affect cartilage and bone development in the elbow joint. These abnormalities can result in separation of cartilage from the bone, failed or delayed development of cartilage to bone, or lesions, which in turn contribute to cartilage damage.2,3[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_separator][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Symptoms” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” google_fonts=”font_family:Droid%20Sans%3Aregular%2C700|font_style:700%20bold%20regular%3A700%3Anormal” css=”.vc_custom_1476383715801{padding-bottom: 2% !important;}”][vc_column_text]Symptoms of elbow dysplasia include abnormal gait (how a dog walks, such as straight or normal versus wobbly or erratic), lameness, stiffness, and limping, due to the pain in the elbows.2,4[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_separator][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Diagnosis” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” google_fonts=”font_family:Droid%20Sans%3Aregular%2C700|font_style:700%20bold%20regular%3A700%3Anormal” css=”.vc_custom_1476383862080{padding-bottom: 2% !important;}”][vc_column_text]Dogs often become lame between six and twelve months of age and are typically diagnosed through arthroscopic surgery, MRIs, or X-rays. ED can be hard to spot initially, as the lameness can be difficult to attribute to a particular joint.2,3,4[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_separator][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Treatment” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” google_fonts=”font_family:Droid%20Sans%3Aregular%2C700|font_style:700%20bold%20regular%3A700%3Anormal” css=”.vc_custom_1476383903993{padding-bottom: 2% !important;}”][vc_column_text]Dogs diagnosed with elbow dysplasia can be treated in a number of ways depending on the age of the dog and severity of the disease. Conservative treatment involves regular exercise and weight control. Drugs can also be used to alleviate inflammation and pain. Harnesses or carts can also be used to reduce stress on joints. In more severe cases, surgery may be required to remove damaged cartilage, or, in some cases, total replacement of the elbow joint.2,4[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_separator][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Canine Elbow Dysplasia Statistics5” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” google_fonts=”font_family:Droid%20Sans%3Aregular%2C700|font_style:700%20bold%20regular%3A700%3Anormal” css=”.vc_custom_1494008433723{padding-bottom: 2% !important;}”][vc_column_text]Below are statistics of elbow dysplasia in dogs from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals between January 1974 through December 2013.[/vc_column_text][vc_tta_accordion active_section=”9″][vc_tta_section title=”Reveal Breed Statistics” tab_id=”1476384493398-8581dd82-e9843c76-afb1″][vc_column_text]

BreedEvaluationsPercent Dysplastic
Chow Chow95348.4
Pug13844.2
Rottweiler1580439.1
Boerboel10838.9
Bulldog15932.7
Black Russian Terrier48328.2
Bernese Mountain Dog1320427.8
Chinese Shar-Pei57224.0
Newfoundland667623.2
Fila Brasileiro18223.1
Dogue De Bordeaux32121.2
Sussex Spaniel10219.6
American Bulldog41119.2
German Shepherd Dog3652318.9
Irish Water Spaniel50617.2
American Staffordshire Terrier72916.9
Staffordshire Bull Terrier22516.9
American Pit Bull Terrier26215.6
English Setter286215.4
Tibetan Mastiff50014.6
St. Bernard25314.6
Bloodhound116514.5
Mastiff612414.4
Bullmastiff240114.2
Cane Corso32313.6
English Springer Spaniel237513.2
Irish Wolfhound70213.1
Gordon Setter86412.8
Australian Cattle Dog113311.1
Golden Retriever3405411.0
Greater Swiss Mountain Dog232711.0
Labrador Retriever6882310.5
Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier31910.3
Airedale Terrier33910.0
Belgian Malinois16429.7
Bouvier Des Flandres31958.9
Clumber Spaniel3338.7
Giant Schnauzer5158.3
Keeshond10218.2
Shiloh Shepherd4778.0
Spinone Italiano5317.2
Standard Schnauzer1827.1
Afghan Hound2157.0
Rhodesian Ridgeback57276.3
Kuvasz4366.2
Anatolian Shepherd5105.9
Havanese18175.8
Chesapeake Bay Retriever24075.5
Belgian Sheepdog18805.1
Belgian Tervuren33304.8
Beauceron1484.7
Kerry Blue Terrier1964.6
Puli1514.6
Leonberger15244.4
Pointer2394.2
Australian Shepherd70414.1
Shiba Inu4183.8
Wirehaired Pointing Griffon3123.8
Tibetan Terrier1643.7
Great Dane23313.7
Border Terrier4413.6
Cardigan Welsh Corgi3483.4
Shetland Sheepdog7623.4
Old English Sheepdog4693.4
Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen2133.3
French Bulldog3703.2
Basenji3753.2
Alaskan Malamute8323.1
Irish Setter6203.1
Pembroke Welsh Corgi7443.1
Poodle21442.8
Boykin Spaniel1862.7
German Wirehaired Pointer6912.6
Dutch Shepherd1632.5
Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Ret.6952.4
Samoyed13742.3
Vizsla18642.3
Bearded Collie6512.3
Hybrid8772.2
Mini American/Mini Australian5122.0
Welsh Springer Spaniel6912.0
Labradoodle2671.9
Brittany11371.9
Finnish Lapphund1191.7
Weimaraner15221.6
Rat Terrier3121.6
Norwich Terrier1231.6
Coton De Tulear5471.6
Collie4301.6
Portuguese Water Dog28751.5
Great Pyrenees8541.5
Canaan1491.3
Akita22361.3
Border Collie26211.2
Cocker Spaniel4211.0
Doberman Pinscher22670.9
German Shorthaired Pointer19450.9
Flat-Coated Retriever23500.8
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel5730.7
American Eskimo Dog1340.7
Boxer6390.6
Dalmatian3860.5
Bichon Frise6340.5
Curly-Coated Retriever2620.4
Field Spaniel2660.4
Briard6010.2
English Cocker Spaniel3110.0
Finnish Spitz1130.0
Siberian Husky2790.0
Norwegian Elkhound1540.0
Beagle1280.0

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  1. Elbow Dysplasia Types“. Orthopedic Foundation for Animals. http://www.offa.org/ed_types.html. Retrieved 2014-03-14.
  2. If Your Dog’s Gait is Changing, Check for Elbow Dysplasia“. Mercola.com. http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2012/04/16/canine-elbow-dysplasia.aspx. Retrieved 2014-03-14.
  3. Pead MJ and Guthrie S. “Elbow dysplasia in dogs – a new scheme explained“. http://www.bva.co.uk/public/documents/chs_elbow.pdf. Retrieved 2014-03-14.
  4. Elbow Dysplasia in Dogs“. WebMD.com. http://pets.webmd.com/dogs/elbow-dysplasia-dogs. Retrieved 2013-03-14.
  5. Elbow Dysplasia Statistics“. Orthopedic Foundation for Animals. http://www.offa.org/stats_ed.html. Retrieved 2014-03-14.

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